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A high-content screen with mouse primary cortical neurons identified several topoisomerase I and II inhibitors (white flurries covering pink neuron) that unsilence the paternal copy of Ube3a. Illustration by Janet Iwasa.

December 21, 2011

UNC study could lead to a treatment for Angelman syndrome

An interdisciplinary team of UNC scientists say they have found a way to “awaken” the paternal allele of Ube3a, which could lead to a potential treatment strategy for AS. Their results were published online by the journal Nature.

Chronic Illness, UNC Stories

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Brittany and Chuck Pope

December 19, 2011

Chuck and Brittany Pope: Drawn Closer Through Serious Illness

A young couple from Pitt County weathers a bad disease, an unexpected relapse and toxic treatments over a journey that has brought them closer after it earlier drove them apart.

Chronic Illness, UNC Stories

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Chuck and Brittany Pope with their son

December 19, 2011

Serious illness can be a great teacher

Elizabeth Swaringen, who writes our Family House Diaries stories, shares additional insights about the couple featured in the latest installment.

Chronic Illness, UNC Stories

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Douglas R. Morgan

December 14, 2011

UNC Center for Latino Health receives prestigious award from the go...

Douglas Morgan, MD, MPH, will receive the Ohtli Award on behalf of the UNC Center for Latino Health, UNC Health Care, and UNC Health Sciences.

Awards, Community, North Carolina

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December 7, 2011

UNC Health Care, BCBSNC open Carolina Advanced Health practice

Carolina Advanced Health, a new primary care physician practice from UNC Health Care and Blue Cross and Blue Shield of North Carolina (BCBSNC) specializing in the treatment of adults with chronic medical conditions, opened Wednesday, Dec. 7.

Chronic Illness

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R. Jude Samulski

November 30, 2011

Clinical trial for muscular dystrophy demonstrates safety of custom...

Researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill have shown that it is safe to cut and paste together different viruses in an effort to create the ultimate vehicle for gene therapy.

Clinical Trials, Genetics, Treatment

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Mary Anne Dooley

November 16, 2011

Study: Mycophenolate is superior to azathioprine as treatment for l...

An international study finds that the immunosuppressant drug mycophenolate mofetil is superior to azathioprine, an older immunosuppressant, as a maintenance therapy for lupus nephritis. Dr. Mary Anne Dooley of UNC is first author of the study.

Chronic Illness, Research, Studies, Treatment

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Epicardial cells (blue) form a single layer in the adult uninjured heart (panel A

November 15, 2011

Scarring a necessary evil to prevent further damage after heart attack

Researchers have long sought ways to avoid scarring of the heart after a heart attack. But now new research from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine shows that interrupting this process can weaken heart function even further.

Cardiology, Heart Health, Research, Treatment

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Color-coded chromosomes. Image source: NIGMS

November 1, 2011

Growing without cell division

An international team of scientists, including biologists from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, may have pinpointed for the first time the mechanism responsible for cell polyploidy, a state in which cells contain more than 2 paired sets of chromosomes.

Collaboration, Genetics, Innovation, Research

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Illustration of a flu virus.

October 25, 2011

Study: Obesity limits effectiveness of flu vaccines

People carrying extra pounds may need extra protection from influenza. New research from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill shows that obesity may make annual flu shots less effective.

Nutrition, Studies, Treatment, Wellness

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October 24, 2011

Morning UV exposure may be less damaging to the skin

Research from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill suggests that the timing of exposure to UV rays – early in the morning or later in the afternoon – can influence the onset of skin cancer.

Skin Health, Wellness

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