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A person teaching a room of nurses.

February 14, 2008

UNC offers training program for nurses as responsibilities in foren...

CHAPEL HILL - In response to a large number of assault crimes being reported statewide, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Nursing is offering nurses a dual program for forensic nurse examiner and sexual assault nurse examiner training.

Sexual Assault, Treatment

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UNC Chapel

February 14, 2008

Schizophrenia Treatment and Evaluation Program (STEP) Symposium

Schizophrenia is an illness that is twice as common as Alzheimer's disease. More than two million Americans cope with this brain disease, which affects the ability to process information, organize thoughts and perceive the environment. An estimated one out of 100 people will develop schizophrenia in their lifetime.

Mental Health, Treatment

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Illustration of three brains increasing in size.

February 14, 2008

Research: autistic children’s brains grow larger during first...

CHAPEL HILL - By age 2, children with the often-devastating neurological condition physicians call autism show a generalized enlargement of their brains, a new University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and Duke University medical schools study concludes.

Neurology, Research

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UNC Chapel

February 14, 2008

Computer keyboards in health-care settings should be disinfected da...

In the health-care setting, computers are now almost as common as tongue depressors.

Research, Workplace Health

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Young man smiling.

February 14, 2008

Idursulfase is effective treatment for Hunter syndrome, UNC-led cli...

CHAPEL HILL – An article reporting results from a pivotal clinical trial that helped gain U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval for the first treatment for Hunter syndrome has been published online by the journal Genetics in Medicine.

Chronic Illness, Clinical Trials, Studies

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UNC Chapel

February 14, 2008

Between 41 and 71 percent of U.S. residents will need blood transfu...

CHAPEL HILL – Between 41 and 71 percent of people in the United States will need a blood transfusion at some point in their lives, a study conducted at the University of North Carolina Hospitals estimates.

Hematology, Procedures, Studies

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February 14, 2008

UNC Hospitals Establishes Rapid Response Team

CHAPEL HILL -- Many hospitals have emergency resuscitation teams that spring into action when a patient goes into cardiopulmonary arrest -- when the person's heart or lungs, or both, stop working. When this happens at UNC Hospitals, it's called a "Code Blue."

Procedures, Treatment

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UNC Chapel

February 14, 2008

Improving sleep behaviors reduces frequency and intensity of headac...

Women who suffer from "transformed migraine" experienced a significant reduction in headache frequency and intensity after taking simple steps to improve their sleep behaviors, a University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill study has found.

Studies, Wellness

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UNC Chapel

February 14, 2008

Some popular non-aspirin pain drugs may slow tendon healing, new st...

CHAPEL HILL -- Some popular anti-inflammatory drugs slow tendon healing in laboratory animals when taken immediately after surgery, according to research conducted at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Orthopedics, Pain, Research, Studies

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Man in wheelchair

February 14, 2008

First clinical trial of gene therapy for muscular dystrophy now und...

CHAPEL HILL -- The first gene therapy human trial in the United States for a form of muscular dystrophy is under way.

Clinical Trials, Genetics

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Illustration of a person skateboarding down an arrow.

February 14, 2008

Wide variety of physical activities may protect teens against risky...

CHAPEL HILL -- New research out of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill finds that physically active adolescents are not only improving their health - they also are decreasing the chance that they will get into trouble.

Research, Studies

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Photo illustration of an alcoholic drink with a skull inside.

February 14, 2008

Low-intensity therapy plus medication may provide more accessible t...

CHAPEL HILL - Low-intensity therapy offered by medical doctors, combined with either medication or specialized behavior therapy, can effectively treat alcoholism, making treatment more readily available to people who need it, according to a study conducted by researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and numerous other sites nationwide.

Research, Studies, Substance Abuse, Treatment

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