UNC Health Talk

Tag: Microbiology and Immunology

November 13, 2014

On Auto Attack

Our own immune cells can destroy other healthy cells to cause severe and chronic diseases. Maureen Su, MD, a 2014 Jefferson-Pilot award winner, studies how this autoimmunity happens and what it might tell us about potential cancer therapies.

Cancer, Chronic Illness, Physician Stories

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Edward Miao

November 13, 2014

The Battle against Microscopic Bugs

Edward Miao, MD, PhD, earns a Jefferson-Pilot Award for his groundbreaking work on the interplay between dangerous pathogens and the human immune response.

Immunity, Physician Stories, Research

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April 8, 2014

UNC researchers find genetic trigger for RSV-induced infant hospita...

The discovery could lead to new therapies and better diagnostics, resulting in fewer hospitalizations of children with respiratory syncytial virus, the leading cause of severe lung infection in babies.

Genetics, Pulmonology, Research

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Rita Tamayo

March 18, 2014

Breaking Down Bacteria

Rita Tamayo, PhD, a UNC School of Medicine Simmons Scholar, takes on two dangerous microbes that infiltrate water supplies and hospitals.

Physician Stories, Research

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February 26, 2014

UNC researchers discover new target for dengue virus vaccine

By re-engineering a tiny chain of amino acids in one type of dengue virus, Ralph Baric and Aravinda de Silva discover a new path toward solving the dengue vaccine dilemma. The research has the potential to transform vaccine development for other diseases, including SARS and HIV.

Research, Vaccines

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February 14, 2014

Corbett continues quest for dengue fever vaccine

In this new series, we profile graduate students who conduct research in labs across the UNC School of Medicine. First up is Kizzmekia Corbett, who received an off-campus dissertation fellowship from the UNC Graduate School to travel to Sri Lanka. Corbett will collect blood samples to search for a specific antibody response to the dengue virus, a key step in creating a vaccine for the world's most widespread mosquito-borne disease.

Physician Stories, Research, Vaccines

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UNC Chapel

September 12, 2013

UNC researchers identify a new pathway that triggers septic shock

This research indicates that both exterior and interior sensors work together to detect the same component of bacterial cell membranes, a molecule called lipopolysaccharide or LPS.

Immunity, Research

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Cells infected with the KSHV virus fluoresce yellow. The KSHV virus remains dormant in more than 95 percent of infected patients. Source – UNC/Damania Lab

February 13, 2013

UNC researchers discover gene that suppresses herpes viruses

A research team led by Blossom Damania, PhD, found that suppressing the TLK enzyme causes the activation of the lytic cycle of both EBV and KSHV. During this active phase, these viruses begin to spread and replicate, and become vulnerable to anti-viral treatments.

Genetics, Genome, Research, Sexual Health

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Shown in red are bacteria that have invaded host cells and escaped into the interior cytosolic compartment of the cell. Credit: Miao lab

January 24, 2013

Immune cell suicide alarm helps destroy escaping bacteria

A University of North Carolina School of Medicine study may have implications for thwarting the effects of bioterrorism attack with lethal microbes, as well as finding a way to save people in septic shock, an overwhelming bacterial infection of the blood.

Immunity, Immunology, Research

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T cells (red

July 5, 2012

Antibodies reverse Type 1 diabetes in new immunotherapy study

Scientists at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine have used injections of antibodies to rapidly reverse the onset of Type I diabetes in mice genetically bred to develop the disease.

Diabetes, Immunology, Studies, Treatment

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